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Citing Your Sources - MLA & APA Style - Longview

Changes in APA 7th Edition

The Running Head. The “running head” is no longer required for student papers.

Spacing. Use only one space after a period or other punctuation mark at the end of the sentence. 

Use of “They.” Use the singular pronoun “they” to refer to a person who prefers that pronoun or when the gender of the person is “unknown or irrelevant to the context of the usage” (APA, 2020, p. 120).

Quotation Marks. Also, instead of using italics to highlight a unique example, you should now use double quotation marks. 

Et al. Regarding in-text citations, you may now use the abbreviation “et al.” (and others) more frequently when citing multiple authors within the text. 

Place of Publication. For full citations at the end of the paper, you no longer have to list the place of publication.

Issue Number. Regarding journal citations, you now must always include the journal issue number.

Hyperlinks. When using a hyperlink for a DOI (digital object identifier) or a URL (uniform resource locator) on the reference list, you no longer have to include the phrase “Retrieved from” or “Accessed from.” In addition, these hyperlinks to web addresses “should be live if the work is to be published or read online” (APA, 2020, p. 299). 

Online Media. Finally, the seventh edition of the APA guidelines includes a special new section for online media. So if you are taking information from social media sites such as Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, or other similar websites, be sure to consult that section of the seventh edition, and look over the basic rules and the examples.

From Jim LaBate, Writing Specialist, The Writing and Research Center, Hudson Valley Community College